During non-summer months, our ministry focuses on providing a sacred space for healing, quiet discernment, spiritual renewal and Christian fellowship. We hope that both individuals and small retreat groups will experience opportunities for healing at Glory Ridge through all the beautiful months of fall, winter, and spring. Children’s Home retreats, church picnics, and weekend service project groups bless us with their presence each year. Our vision is to expand this ministry even further.  We look forward to welcoming church leadership teams, musicians, and counselors to use Glory Ridge for their unique work and worship in the world. We are eager also to host individuals, couples, and families simply seeking quiet in God’s splendid creation in order to hear God’s voice more clearly.

From our Sabbath Ministry Team

We, the Ministry Team desire...

To introduce people to Christ and help them grow in their relationship with Him. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” John 3:16

To teach how God’s command to take weekly Sabbath rest is God’s precious gift, a “spiritual delight” for his children. Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God...For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.” Exodus 20:8-11

“And he said to them, The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath.” Mark 2:27

To teach men and women to walk with God through daily “Sabbath Moments.” The healing of the soul, body, and relationships is the natural consequence of God’s presence through the Holy Spirit with and within us. “Be still and know that I am God. I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth!” Psalm 46:10

“But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law.” Galatians 5:22-23

To teach true Sabbath rest and walking with God while living it out ourselves. “... that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him: bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God.” Colossians 1:9-10


Resources

A Busy, Unhurried Life

In this two-part podcast, Ransomed Heart Ministries shares that although our lives are busy - they don't have to be hurried. John and Allen discuss how to eliminate hurry and create space for soul care.

https://www.ransomedheart.com/rhplay/podcast/busy-unhurried-life-part-1

https://www.ransomedheart.com/rhplay/podcast/busy-unhurried-life-part-2

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Absolutely Good

And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God,
who loved me and gave himself for me.
Galatians 2:20b

… Vital to every soul that needs healing (all of us) is the knowledge that God is absolutely good, and that He loves us with the kind of love capable of radically changing us.  [1]

It is an awesome thing to be the object of God’s love. His love is active and skillful, consuming and mighty.  He discloses Himself, and in the process breaks up our misrepresentations and heals our fears.  Wonderful freedom comes to those who place themselves utterly in His hands.  Yet the enemy prowls about, conjuring up dark illusions in a relentless effort to dissuade us from our God. Too often we hold back, wary of what God might do with us if we abandoned all else and yielded to Him fully.  Still, He is good.  To every seeker who opens the scriptures, to every needy soul who lifts their eyes to Him, our loving God imparts true symbols, true knowledge of His character, His ways, even His name.  It is His holy desire that all would confess, “He loved me and gave Himself for me.”

PRAYER: Gracious Father, we thank you for pursuing us in Your love.  We thank you for desiring relationship with us, and for giving Your Son that we might know you truly and wholly. Thank You that Your Spirit is already at work within us.  Release in us greater courage and trust that we might lay down every reservation and be cleansed of every confusion.  Increase our desire to know You in Your absolute goodness.  You are worthy of all honor and glory and praise, now and forever.

[1] Leanne Payne, The Healing Presence (Grand Rapids, Baker Books, 1995), p. 132.
Painting: Václav Mánes, 1832, Healing the Blind Man, [Public domain] via Wikimedia Commons

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Summer Sabbath? 

this is an excerpt from the may 2019 Ransomed Heart Ministries’ newsletter that asks an important question, “What will you do this summer to be kind to your soul? Where is your sabbath this summer?” 

“…I’m guessing you’re making plans for the next several months, even if they are plans that you can’t make plans this year. And I’d like to step in as an advocate for your soul—which probably needs some advocating, if you’re like most adults. The pace of life, the constant demands, the drone of media coming our way make any kind of soul kindness hard to come by. Our lives are so full we lost track of our souls long ago.

Thus, my letter.

You have a soul. It is a lovely gift from God. Your soul is what enables you to enjoy your life. When you find yourself laughing at something in a carefree way, that’s your soul feeling happy. When you are moved deeply by someone else’s story, that’s your soul too. When beauty makes you worship, when stillness allows you to exhale deeply, that’s your soul doing well. Your soul is an extraordinary gift from God. And it needs some care.

As Jesus said, “What does a man have if he gets all the world and loses his own soul? What can a man give to buy back his soul?” (Matthew 16:26). You can lose your soul long before you die, by the way. It’s lost quite easily in the mad rush of life, the unrelenting pressure, hurry, worry, fear and lack of any real space to simply be human. 

So—what will you do this summer to be kind to your soul? Where is your sabbath this summer?

To clarify, family “visits” do not count as sabbath or soul care. I understand the need for family visits; they play an important role in our relational networks. But they are not sabbath, not even vacation, for the simple reason that they require from us. Often they require a great deal. When we enter into the gravitational field of family visits, we encounter all the dynamics of family ecosystems—everyone’s brokenness, their demands, their disappointments, and their warfare. It’s just the way it is in a broken world. I’m not disparaging family visits; I’m simply trying to point out that they do not qualify for sabbath in any form or fashion.

Notice—what’s the condition of your soul when you return from a week with the inlaws? Don’t you typically say to yourself, “I need a vacation?” And if you could choose between the obligatory family visit or two weeks in Tahiti, which does your heart leap at? Well...there ya go.

Banzai weekends also do not count for sabbath, vacation, or soul care. Rushing out the door to get to some destination where you go-go-go all weekend can be loads of fun, but again—notice the condition you’re in Monday morning when you return to work. You’re exhausted; you need caffeine to even keep going. 

You shall know them by their fruits. 

…This is very simple really—sabbath makes you feel rested. It makes you feel renewed. It restores your soul, to quote the famous Psalm. 

Sabbath reconnects you to the God you love, and allows you time to linger with him unhurried. It also reconnects you with your own soul, allows you to feel, to think about stuff you normally don’t get to think about. By its nature, sabbath is not an adrenaline experience.

So—as you make your summer plans, when is your sabbath?

It doesn’t have to be that gorgeous cottage in Hawaii, or villa in Tuscany (which is good news). Sabbath is so much more available, attainable. It can be a choice to simply set aside evenings every week this summer, where all you do is sit on the porch and enjoy the sunset, let the breeze caress your face, do absolutely nothing at all. A friend has a hammock on her porch; she said to her husband, “I’m going to lie in the hammock and do nothing; I get to be human again.”

Sabbath can be long walks in your neighborhood, the park, or “open spaces” common now to most urban areas. (Notice I didn’t say a run or mountain bike ride, because sabbath has a nonchalant nature to it. It’s slow, kind, easy, simple. Sabbath walks let you notice flowers, birds, a stream—all the things we normally rush by.)

Nothing in this mad world is going to encourage you to plan, and protect sabbath. It’s something you’ll have to choose, and fight for. But it’s utterly worth it, I promise.

So—before you set this letter down and go on with the ten other things currently demanding your attention, stay with the question for sixty seconds—What will you do for sabbath this summer?

Block it out on your calendar.”

John Eldredge